Eye Services FAQ

We've provided common questions and answers below. If you have additional questions, please call us or ask at your next appointment. We provide all levels of eye exams from complex medical to routine vision and contact lens fitting.

  • Billing Team
  • Front Desk
  • Ophthalmic Technician
  • Nursing Staff
  • Nursing Staff
  • Ophthalmic Technician
  • Ophthalmic Technician
  • Management team
  • Medical records
  • Ophthalmic Technician
  • Surgery Team
  • Surgery Team
  • Surgery Team
  • Optical Team
  • Optical Team
  • Surgey Counselor

FAQs

Q. Do I need to bring anything with me to my eye appointment?

A. Please bring your current insurance card and a list of current medications including dosages. You should also bring your current glasses or contacts. Visit the Patient Info page for a full details about your first appointment.

Q. How often should my family get our eyes checked?

A. Infants should have their eyes checked before the age of 2. Children should have their eyes checked again prior to entering school for the first time. Adults should have an annual eye exam.

Quality Eye Doctors In Medford, Oregon

Q. Does my child still need a comprehensive eye health and vision exam if they've already had a vision screening at their school?

A. Yes. Though school vision screenings are an excellent way for the school systems to pick up some abnormalities in your child's vision, they are not comprehensive enough to detect eye health issues or mild to moderate vision problems. To accurately detect problems that may affect your child's vision, schedule a comprehensive eye health and vision exam.

Q. Why do I need reading glasses?

A. As we get older, a natural age-related process occurs that affects everyone - even if you have always had normal vision. When you go past the age of 40-50, the lens inside your eye loses its elasticity and cannot focus on objects that are close. For this condition, called presbyopia, you normally need reading glasses. Come in for an eye exam to accurately determine your eye health and vision.

Q. Can I wear contact lenses?

A. Contact lens technology has advanced greatly in recent years, giving people freedom, comfort and choice. Almost all refractive errors can be corrected with contact lenses.

Q. What is an Ophthalmologist?

A. An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor (M.D.) who specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases or other conditions. The training required to become an ophthalmologist includes at least four years of medical school (after undergraduate college); a one-year internship in general medicine at a hospital; and a three-year residency in ophthalmology at an accredited teaching program. Many ophthalmologists choose to complete one or two additional years of training in a fellowship, concentrating on a particular aspect of medical or surgical eye care.

Q. What does "board-certified" mean?

A. Board certification means that an ophthalmologist has taken and passed a rigorous examination, which covers all aspects of medical and surgical eye care. The American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) is the main certifying body for ophthalmologists in the United States.